Alessandra Scandella is an illustrator who lives and works in Milan.
Together with other collaborators she founded the Studio Container, which deals with illustration, web design, communication and animation.
She works with watercolor and Indian ink, using cotton paper and preferring natural pigments.
In publishing she collaborates with La Repubblica, Il Venerdi', Editoriale Domus, Bompiani, Marsilio, Mondadori and Piemme, Il Sole 24ORE.
She is completing an illustrated book with Marsilio, The Atlas of ghost towns, which deals with the enhancement and redevelopment of abandoned villages in Italy.
She is a professor at the IED and at the International School of Comics, in Milan.
With Amnesty International she has participated with her illustrations in awareness campaigns for civil rights.
She has also worked with the San Vittore Prison, Fai and Unicef ​​on projects related to social issues.
It is part of the project: 401 E' Amatrice, exhibited at the Milan Triennale, which supports the earthquake victims of Amatrice.
She has also dedicated herself to the creation of large-scale watercolors for exhibitions and wallpapers, exhibiting her watercolors at various exhibitions, including: The new vocabulary of Italian fashion, at the Milan Triennale, Illustri Festival, at the Gallerie d'Italia, Idee in escape, to the Base, in Milan. She also participated in Across Europe with Best Fashion Illustration, in Poland, which exhibits the major European illustrators in the field of fashion and with the Container studio she curated the graphics and illustrations of the Outfit '900 exhibition, at Palazzo Morando, in Milan.
With the Armando Testa agency she created the illustrations for the Lavazza calendar, together with the photographs of Steve McCurry, on Africa and food sustainability.
Watercolor, with its transparency and brightness, has always fascinated her. The glazes of color and the use of water, the spots, the contrast between strong and light tones and the nib drawing that tells the details have always been the elements used in his illustrations.
The subjects she prefers are portraits and nature, in which she often adds surreal elements that give poetry to the image.
Lately she has been working a lot with watercolor animations, she is fascinated by giving movement to water and color spots, illustrations come to life and tell a story.

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